FOUND! The F6F 3-Hellcat lost in January 1943

By Pierre Kosmidis Rod Pearce has dedicated his time and efforts finding underwater aircraft wrecks and seeking closure to the families of hundreds -if not thousands- of Missing in Action (MIA) airmen from all nations that fought during World War Two. Rod has been diving in Papua New Guinea for 40 years and is credited […]

FOUND! The Beaufort A9-217, crashed on November 15, 1943

By Pierre Kosmidis Rod Pearce has dedicated his time and efforts finding underwater aircraft wrecks and seeking closure to the families of hundreds -if not thousands- of Missing in Action (MIA) airmen from all nations that fought during World War Two. Rod has been diving in Papua New Guinea for 40 years and is credited […]

WW2 Wrecks now on Pinterest!

By Pierre Kosmidis WW2wrecks.com is now on Pinterest. Check the link below and follow the action! https://www.pinterest.com/ww2wrecks/

Mitsubishi F1M “Pete” and Nakajima B5N2 “Kate” by Andrew Hamilton

By Pierre Kosmidis The Nakajima B5N2 “Kate” in Kavieng, Papua New Guinea  PHOTO: Andrew Hamilton Australian underwater photographer Andrew Hamilton recently shot images of theMitsubishi F1M “Pete” and Nakajima B5N2 “Kate” aircraft wrecks in Kavieng, Papua New Guinea. Kavieng peninsula and airstrip  The Mitsubishi F1M “Pete”in Kavieng, Papua New Guinea  PHOTO: Andrew Hamilton Andrew Hamilton plans to visit […]

Locating and identifying WW2 aircraft wrecks: The Kwajalein Missing in Action (MIA) Project

By Pierre Kosmidis   Flight deck of the PBM-3D which crashed at Kwajalein on February 16, 1944 Kwajalein Atoll is part of the Republic of the Marshall Islands. The southernmost and largest island in the atoll is named Kwajalein Island. Dan Farnham speaks to WW2 Wrecks andpierekosmidis.blogspot.com about the Kwajalein Missing in Action (MIA) Project:  “The […]

American mutilation of Japanese war dead

By Pierre Kosmidis SOURCE During World War II, some members of the United States military mutilated dead Japanese service personnel in the Pacific theater of operations. The mutilation of Japanese service personnel included the taking of body parts as “war souvenirs” and “war trophies”. Teeth and skulls were the most commonly taken “trophies”, although other […]